The 
Daguerreian Society


On this day (April 21) in the year 1855 the following article appeared 
in the "PROVINCIAL FREEMAN" (Toronto, Canada West)
- - - - - - - - - -


   NIAGARA, April 18, 1855. - The town of Niagara was this morning, 
about a quarter before seven o'clock, visited by a fearful hurricane.  
The night had been very stormy, with thunder and heavy showers of rain.  
A little before the hour referred to, the sky assumed a sea-green 
colour, succeeded in a few minutes by a clear white, which indicated 
the presence of the hurricane.  The rush of wind lasted about five 
minutes, and was at its height not more than one minute.  But the 
damage it did was tremendous.
   It struck the Niagara Car Works, and in an instant levelled two 
large finishing shops, each 175 feet by 50, containing a number of new 
cars, and took the roofs partly off some of the other buildings.  A 
large new frame 200 feet by 70, intended for a foundry, and ready to be 
enclosed, was piled in a mass.  The engine house of the Erie and 
Ontario Railway was very much twisted, and the large wood shed nearly 
destroyed.
   Throughout the town the damage was very great--roofs, fences, and 
chimneys blown down in all directions.  The St. Andrew's Church 
received great injury--a third of the roof and gallery inside were 
swept away.  Graves and Pruden's large Daguerrean Saloon was turned 
over two or three times, and is a complete wreck.
   The loss to Messrs. Brainerds, Pierson & Co. is great, but the 
amount has not yet been ascertained.  We learn however, that their 
principal building, containing their machinery, is not injured except 
the roof, and that it will be in operation again in two days, and their 
other buildings will be replaced temporarily, so that their whole works 
may again be in operation in ten days from this time.
   It happened most providentially that the day had been set apart as 
the Fast Day, else we should have had to lament the loss of from 50 to 
100 lives in the Car Factory.  As it is, thank God, neither life was 
lost, nor any person severely injured.
   We have not heard, up to the present hour, whether the hurricane 
extended far.  It came directly from the north, and apparently struck 
the ground at intervals.


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Posted for your enjoyment.     Gary W. Ewer     
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04-21-99


Return to: DagNews 1999

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