The 
Daguerreian Society


On this day(December 2,) 
the following notices appeared in their respective publications:
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

In the 1846 issue of "The Daily Chronotype" (Boston, Vol. 2, No. 238):

  PHOTOGRAPHY.-- The wonder of childhood is, that the picture on the 
looking glass will not stay; the wonder of manhood, in this age, and 
really one of the greatest wonders, is that the picture has been made to 
stay.  That faithful image, which used to laugh through the mirror when 
we did, and vanish when we ran away, is now fastened to the silvered 
surface.  And there it stays, stock still, while the living subject goes 
down the current of Time and Change, through this and into other worlds.
  Our oldest boy had got a likeness at Chase's, and the smaller fry were 
discussing the question how the picture was made, when the only 
plausible theory advanced was that it was a looking-glass picture pasted 
on.  It struck us that older people may not hit much nearer when they 
broach theories on subjects of which they know nothing;--but we only 
took the pen to say that Mr. Chase makes the best use of his light, and 
his pictures are not only faithful, but faithfully put up.  See his 
advertisement.

* * * * * * * 

and in the 1841 "Salem Register" (Salem, Mass):

  THE DAGUERREOTYPE AN INSTRUMENT OF POLICE.  It never entered the head, 
probably, of M. Daguerre, when perfecting the process of causing the 
sun-beams to play the limner, that his beautiful application of science 
would become a resource for the repression of crime.  Such, however, is 
the fact, and now, the French police; when any suspicious person or 
known criminal is arrested, cause him to be daguerreotyped, and his 
likeness is appended to the register; so that if, after he is set at 
liberty, he shall again be implicated in any offence, his likeness being 
exhibited to the various police agents, the detection becomes more easy.
  The rogues however have found this out, and now, when subjected to the 
process of daguerreotyping, make such hideous grimaces, as entirely to 
alter the usual expression of the countenance.--N.Y. American.

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Posted for your enjoyment.      Gary W. Ewer       
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12-02-96


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